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General Wellness Archives - Page 5 of 10 - Dietetic Directions - Dietitian and Nutritionist in Kitchener/Waterloo
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General Wellness Tag

Dietitian vs. Nutritionist vs. Holistic Nutritionist

Dietitian vs. Nutritionist vs. Holistic Nutritionist

Have you ever seen a “nutritionist” on the nightly news or Dr. Oz giving advice and asked yourself: Who is this person and what are their qualifications? In a world inundated with nutrition information, we must question the source of information to determine credibility. Today, let’s explore a common question: Are Dietitians and Nutritionists the same thing?  



Education 

Supervised Training 

Work Settings

Dietary Recommendations 

Benefit Coverage?

Regulated by a professional governing body?

Call themselves Nutritionist 

Call themselves a Dietitian?

Registered Dietitian (RD)

Minimum 4 year Bachelor's degree in food and nutrition. 


Completition of minimum 1 year accredited dietetic internship in clinical or community setting. 


Must pass Dietetic Registration exam for licensing. 


Optional: Masters or PhD degrees, continuing education certificates.


Complete over 1250 hours of supervised training.


Hositals, Community Health Centres, Diabetes Education Centres, Family Health Teams, food service, grocery stores, Long Term Care, Private Practice etc. 


Use scientific research, practice-based evidence as well as government approved tools.


Potential for remedial action from the College of Dietitians if making unsubstantiated claims not supported by research. 


Registered Dietitian services are covered by many benefit plans.


Covered by OHIP through hospitals, community health centres, diabetes education programs and family health teams. 


Yes, professionally regulated by provincial college.  Practice in accordance to set laws and standards to protect the public.  Yearly quality assurance to ensure up-to-date education, ethical practice and competence. 


Yes. 


Yes. 

Nutritionist 


No formal nutrition training required. Title of "nutritionist", "nutrition expert" or "registered nutritionist" is not protected or regulated.




Not mandatory.



Private Practice or group classes.


Unable to work in hospitals because not clinically trained with disease management. 


Often more "alternative" treatment plans that do not have to be evidence-based. 


Not covered by OHIP.


Not covered by insurance plans.


No. 


Yes.


No.

Registered Holistic Nutritionist


Minimum high school education to apply.


Canadian School of Natural Nutrition (CSNN) for 1 - 2 year program and board exam. 

Complete 50 hours of practicum.


Private health clinics, gyms, nutritional supplement companies.


Unable to work in hospitals.


Study natural nutrition diploma program and follow a code of ethics. 


Not covered by OHIP.


Not covered by most insurance plans. 


RHN is a Registered Trademark and NOT a professional designation. 


Yes. 


No. 

* Table is for Ontario only.  The term nutritionist is protected by law in other provinces (Alberta, Nova Scotia, Quebec).      Find out what the differences are between a dietitian, nutritionist, and holistic nutritionist! Click To Tweet   Bottom Line: Be critical of the nutrition information you hear! Question the credibility of information based on...

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Cut Down on your Food Waste!

The average Canadian household throws away one in four produce items, that’s equivalent to about $600 each year! Shockingly, according to the David Suzuki foundation, close to half of all food produced worldwide is wasted or discarded during the processing, transport, supermarkets and in our kitchens. What a shame and waste of good food and valuable resources spent growing and transporting it!   Simplest way to Reduce Food Waste? The best way to cut down on food waste is to become both a creative meal planner and a savvy grocery shopper. Take an inventory of what you have in the fridge, freezer and pantry before grocery shopping. This helps you...

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Three Keys to Weight Management

Did you know that two out of three adults are either overweight or obese?   Moreover, every one of us is at risk for gaining weight. In fact, the average adult gains one to two pounds each year. These small (often unnoticed weight changes) can accumulate and may increase risk of developing heart disease, diabetes and several cancers, especially colon and post-menopausal breast cancer.   The good news is that changes to our diet and lifestyle can help prevent weight gain, help us to lose weight or to keep off the weight we’ve already lost. Remember that changing our lifestyle and making new healthy habits takes time, concerted effort and consistency....

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Time for “Spring Cooking”!

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Rushed Mornings = Missed Breakfast? #NutritionMonth

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It’s #NutritionMonth: Eating 9 to 5!

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What to Look for on Current Nutrition Labels

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Ten Tips for Healthy Aging

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